Is there a difference between "soaked" and "sprouted"?

There is some confusion around the terminology for soaked and dehydrated nuts and seeds. The terms “activated”, "germinated", "soaked" or “crispy nuts” are often used to describe the process of soaking and dehydrating. While none of these terms are incorrect, we have chosen along with many others, to refer to nuts and seeds which have been soaked and dehydrated as “sprouted”. 

At the NutHut we do not soak to grow an actual sprout or root, we soak to deactivate naturally occurring enzyme inhibitors and increase digestibility and nutrition

Before they are soaked, nuts or seeds contain enzyme inhibitors which prevent them from growing into a plant or tree until conditions are optimal. Soaking activates these enzymes, essentially allowing the nut or seed to “wake up”. Many nuts and seeds, such as almonds, pumpkins and shelled sunflower seeds rarely produce a root or sprout, but proper soaking does a similar thing as sprouting, it ends the period of dormancy by inactivating enzyme inhibitors. These rootless sprouts could more accurately be termed “soaked”, but we feel that this might create added confusion, so for now we will continue to call our soaked and dehydrated nuts and seeds, “sprouted”. More information on sprouting can be found here, and how long to soak your nuts and seeds for sprouting can be found here. 

If you like the idea of getting your nuts and seeds already sprouted, we have them available, click here. 


Elana Cossever
Elana Cossever

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